On This Day in Telephone History December 13TH 1878

On This Day in Telephone History December 13TH 1878- Telephones were first manufactured in Canada at Brantford, Ontario, by James H. Cowherd, who constructed some of the early telephoneapparatus for Alexander Graham Bell. Mr. Cowherd died suddenly on February 27, 1881, and for some time no satisfactory telephones were manufactured.

On This Day in Telephone History December 13TH 1878- Telephones were first manufactured in Canada at Brantford, Ontario, by James H. Cowherd, who constructed some of the early telephoneapparatus for Alexander Graham Bell. Mr. Cowherd died suddenly on February 27, 1881, and for some time no satisfactory telephones were manufactured.

On This Day in Telephone History December 12TH 1901

On This Day in Telephone History December 12TH 1901 At Signal Hill in St. John's, Newfoundland, Guglielmo Marconi received the first transatlantic radio signal with a telephone receiver and a wire antenna kept aloft by a kite. Morse code for the letter "S" was transmitted approximately 2100 miles across the Atlantic Ocean from Poldhu, Cornwall, England. The first radio message was sent a year later.

On This Day in Telephone History December 12TH 1901 At Signal Hill in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Guglielmo Marconi received the first transatlantic radio signal with a telephone receiver and a wire antenna kept aloft by a kite. Morse code for the letter “S” was transmitted approximately 2100 miles across the Atlantic Ocean from Poldhu, Cornwall, England. The first radio message was sent a year later.

On This Day in Telephone History December 11TH 1956

On This Day in Telephone History December 11TH 1956 - Alaska submarine cable formally opened with ceremonies in Washington, D. C., Seattle and four Alaska cities. The ceremony climaxed two years of work and an investment of $21 million. The AT&T cable, running from Port Angeles, Wash., to Ketchikan, Alaska, is 877 miles long. The Alaska Communication System's cable, joining at Ketchikan and running to Skagway, Alaska, covers an additional 400 miles through inland waterways along the Alaskan coast.

On This Day in Telephone History December 11TH 1956 – Alaska submarine cable formally opened with ceremonies in Washington, D. C., Seattle and four Alaska cities. The ceremony climaxed two years of work and an investment of $21 million. The AT&T cable, running from Port Angeles, Wash., to Ketchikan, Alaska, is 877 miles long. The Alaska Communication System’s cable, joining at Ketchikan and running to Skagway, Alaska, covers an additional 400 miles through inland waterways along the Alaskan coast.

On This Day in Telephone History December 10TH 1956

On This Day in Telephone History December 10TH 1956 - The 1956 Nobel Prize in physics awarded to inventors of the transistor: Dr. Walter H. Brattain of Bell Laboratories, Dr. William Shockley and Dr. John Bardeen.

On This Day in Telephone History December 10TH 1956 – The 1956 Nobel Prize in physics awarded to inventors of the transistor: Dr. Walter H. Brattain of Bell Laboratories, Dr. William Shockley and Dr. John Bardeen.

On This Day in Telephone History December 9TH 1879

Telephone Numbers - The latter part of 1879 and the early part of 1880 saw the first use of telephone numbers at Lowell, Mass. The story is well substantiated that during an epidemic of measles, Dr. Moses Greeley Parker feared that Lowell's four operators might succumb and bring about a paralysis of telephone service. He recommended the use of numbers for calling Lowell's more than 200 subscribers, so that substitute operators might be more easily trained in the event of such an emergency. The telephone management at Lowell feared that the public would take the assignment of numbers as an indignity, but the telephone users saw the practical value of the change immediately and it went into effect with no stir whatsoever.

Telephone Numbers – The latter part of 1879 and the early part of 1880 saw the first use of telephone numbers at Lowell, Mass. The story is well substantiated that during an epidemic of measles, Dr. Moses Greeley Parker feared that Lowell’s four operators might succumb and bring about a paralysis of telephone service. He recommended the use of numbers for calling Lowell’s more than 200 subscribers, so that substitute operators might be more easily trained in the event of such an emergency. The telephone management at Lowell feared that the public would take the assignment of numbers as an indignity, but the telephone users saw the practical value of the change immediately and it went into effect with no stir whatsoever.

On This Day in Telephone History December 8TH 1947

On This Day in Telephone History December 8TH 1947 - Development of Alpeth cable with aluminum sheath covered with polyethylene plastic announced. Since lead-sheathed cable was at peak production, and available lead was a postwar scarcity, Western Electric planned to use Alpeth cable in exchange areas. This enabled Western Electric cable plants to increase their output.
On This Day in Telephone History December 8TH 1947 – Development of Alpeth cable with aluminum sheath covered with polyethylene plastic announced. Since lead-sheathed cable was at peak production, and available lead was a postwar scarcity, Western Electric planned to use Alpeth cable in exchange areas. This enabled Western Electric cable plants to increase their output.
The Conversation - Harry Caul Editing

2600 Meeting Friday, December 7TH

We will be showing "The Conversation" and...

Surveillance expert Harry Caul (Gene Hackman) is hired by a mysterious client's brusque aide (Harrison Ford) to tail a young couple, Mark (Frederic Forrest) and Ann (Cindy Williams). Tracking the pair through San Francisco's Union Square, Caul and his associate Stan (John Cazale) manage to record a cryptic conversation between them. Tormented by memories of a previous case that ended badly, Caul becomes obsessed with the resulting tape, trying to determine if the couple are in danger.

Surveillance expert Harry Caul (Gene Hackman) is hired by a mysterious client's brusque aide (Harrison Ford) to tail a young couple, Mark (Frederic Forrest) and Ann (Cindy Williams). Tracking the pair through San Francisco's Union Square, Caul and his associate Stan (John Cazale) manage to record a cryptic conversation between them. Tormented by memories of a previous case that ended badly, Caul becomes obsessed with the resulting tape, trying to determine if the couple are in danger.

... serving Charcoal Guido's Pizza!

serving Charcoal Guido's Pizza!